Luxury Plank Flooring Trends: Layouts and Patterns

February 26, 2020

During this next decade and beyond, you can expect to see a lot more vinyl plank flooring installations adorning both abodes and businesses. That’s because vinyl is still hot for flooring, and patterns are popping up everywhere! Thanks to vinyl’s simple installs and low maintenance, the durable product is a dream opportunity for do-it-yourselfers to showcase their skills and play with on-trend layouts and patterns. Since installation doesn’t require expensive equipment and is easy to cut, homeowners can instantly elevate their flooring look with one of these trending design options.

Different LVT Installations

The three main styles dominating the vinyl market include luxury vinyl tile, luxury vinyl planks, and sheet vinyl. These products require different vinyl flooring installation types: a click-lock system or glue down. Many LVT and LVP products come with a lock-in system that features a tongue and groove for easier installation that can be completed by DIYers. These flooring types float on top of the subfloor unlike glue-down vinyl that’s glued down to the concrete or plywood subfloor. Because this installation requires more prep to avoid any flaws from showing, it’s best to have a professional finish the job. Sheet vinyl also requires a vinyl flooring adhesive for glue-down installation, but the thinner product doesn’t provide the same durability as glue-down LVT or LVP products and will require a full replacement if any part of the flooring gets damaged. 

Luxury Vinyl Layouts and Patterns

Picking out the pattern is a fun part of the vinyl flooring process, but you’ll need to decide on the layout first, as it could dictate the pattern in some cases and also guide you on where to start. Things to consider include features, room size, and lighting. Vinyl should be installed perpendicular to front doors in entryways, horizontally throughout when there are steps, parallel to the longest wall, parallel to the natural light source, and parallel to the lines of angled walls. With these layout tips in mind, choose from one of the many patterns listed below.

Diagonal Pattern

Diagonal is a special, particular pattern that’s offset but on a 45-degree angle. This change in angle is what adds dimension and uniqueness to any space. While it also makes a home look refreshed and upscale, the rare pattern does cost more to complete because of the extra cuts required and additional time needed for labor. 

Offset Pattern

Offset, also known as brick or running bond, is where the tiles or planks are offset by half of its width. This universal pattern for both types of flooring is one of the most common, traditional flooring patterns you’ll see. However, you can change the 50/50 offset to be a 40/60 or 30/70 offset for a more interesting and varied pattern.

Stagger Pattern

Stagger is another common pattern where the vinyl tile or planks are arranged on alternating sides of a centerline so that the seams appear to be random. The first row should end in a short piece, so you’ll start the second row at the end of the first row with a long piece to achieve a staggered look. The third row starts at the end of the second row with another short piece that’s different in length. For a more staggered style, start each fourth row with a plank that’s been cut by a few inches. Repeat the alternating rows until finished. It’s also a great way to showcase two or three colors of vinyl or styles that include various tones.

Grid Pattern

Grid, also known as stack bond, is a pattern where all vertical and horizontal points of the LVT or LVP are aligned instead of offsetting or staggering the pieces. Because of the perfectly symmetrical positioning, this universal grid pattern creates a more contemporary or modern look. 

Corridor Pattern

Corridor is a type of grid flooring pattern that’s offset by intervening rows, so it mixes a set of horizontal rows sandwiched by vertical columns. It’s a great way to play with color when it comes to vinyl planks where you can mix brown and gray tones or dark and light wood tones to make the pattern more of a showstopper!

Herringbone Pattern

Herringbone, often confused with chevron, is a classic pattern that imitates the look of fish scales by connecting two planks at a 90-degree angle. The sophisticated style is stunning, but it’s another costly look as a result of extra materials and a labor-intensive installation. When laying out a herringbone pattern, the points of the zigzag should either be parallel to the longest wall of a room or facing the window. 

Random Pattern

Random is an arrangement where the LVT or LVP flooring is placed in no particular order. The aimless design creates a versatile look and can be used to feature one favorite color or to showcase multiple vinyl hues. 

Mixed-Width Pattern

Mixed-width is a dramatic pattern where you mix planks in varying widths. This unique, detailed look makes the home appear more modern and creates a strong statement. It’s also ideal if you have a hard time choosing between narrow and wide plank styles. 

Soldier Pattern

Soldier is similar to a grid pattern but perfectly aligned and stacked vertically instead of horizontally. Mixing the tile direction of the LVT flooring or planks so that vertical and horizontal rows alternate can really create a fun, playful look.

 

Pattern Pride

LVP features a wide range of beautiful backgrounds garnished with realistic knots and grains that it’s becoming more difficult to distinguish vinyl from the real thing. How you choose to lay out your flooring and add a simple or dramatic pattern can quickly change the look of your planks and the overall style of your space. After you’ve picked out the perfect layout and pattern and put in the work, you’ll be able to revel in the beauty of your upgraded space on the daily. Plus, the pride that comes with professionally finishing a DIY project will leave you grinning ear-to-ear and boasting to all of your visitors why you chose your fashionable flooring pattern! 

More About Luxury Vinyl Flooring

Can I Use Luxury Vinyl Planks On Top Of Radiant Heating
What Is the Difference Between 2mm and 4mm Vinyl Flooring